Dog vision problems Ocuglo Pra disease

Does Your Dog Have a Canine Cataract?

Canine cataract symptoms are hard to miss and if your dog is developing one, you’ll be able to easily spot it. The canine cataract is one of the most common eye problems that dogs can develop. The dog can be any age and some dogs are even born with a canine cataract. Certain breeds develop the canine cataract more than others, such as Schnauzers, Cocker Spaniels, Poodles, German Shepherds and Golden Retrievers. Several different kinds of terriers are prone to this eye development as well. A cataract affects the dog’s ability to see clearly and if the canine cataract is not taken care of quickly it can lead to total blindness in the eye that has the cataract.

When a dog is developing a cataract their eye becomes cloudy looking or white. Dog’s eyes that become a bluish grey can also be a symptom of a canine cataract. A cataract will begin to form when the lens fibers in the dog’s eye begins to break down. Sometimes the location of the cataract will not cause a problem but most of the time surgery will be required to remove a canine cataract. The condition is usually inherited and when it is, the canine cataract will show up in puppies as young as 5 weeks.

When breeders have puppies that are born with a cataract they will not breed them if they are a reputable breeder. You never know about puppies that come from puppy meals though. If you have just gotten a new puppy it is a good idea to let the vet check out your new pet’s eyes to make sure they don’t already have a cataract starting. Most of the time though, a canine cataract won’t show up until about a dog is around 6 years old. Some dogs develop cataracts because of diabetes, but you can give medication for that kind of canine cataract. There are different kinds that can form on a dog’s eye. It is a good idea to talk to your vet for more information on what to look for if you suspect your dog may be developing a canine cataract.

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